Highly Deadly Black Tarantula

Album Review of Highly Deadly Black Tarantula by Teeth of the Sea.

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Highly Deadly Black Tarantula

Teeth of the Sea

Highly Deadly Black Tarantula by Teeth of the Sea

Release Date: Nov 13, 2015
Record label: Rocket Recordings
Genre(s): Pop/Rock, Alternative/Indie Rock

80 Music Critic Score
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Highly Deadly Black Tarantula - Very Good, Based on 4 Critics

Drowned In Sound - 80
Based on rating 8/10
80

London quartet Teeth of the Sea have always played their own game rather than that of others. Nominally part of the modern 'psychedelic' scene, but with roots in noise and metal as much as krautrock and prog, they have been one of Britain’s foremost experimental groups for nearly a decade now. Their last album proper, 2013’s Master was a near-perfect record: an odyssey-esque journey across disparate sonic terrains that managed to be both physically and spiritually enlivening.

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Record Collector - 80
Based on rating 4/5
80

On this, their fourth record, London foursome Teeth Of The Sea continue to demonstrate their taste for reinvention. Previous album, 2013’s Master, was a progged-up, techno-infused melodic opus that could have been the score to a sci-fi movie. Highly Deadly… has scaled down the prog and diffused the techno, and if it was a score to anything, it would be the impending apocalypse or post-war fallout (with, one would hope, a slightly happier ending).

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The Quietus
Their review was positive

Fierce. That was the first word that came to mind on hearing London foursome Teeth Of The Sea's third album Master. Fierce, swiftly followed by more impressions, demolition-derbying into each other inside my buffeted brain: brutal, raging, devouring, relentless. Master immediately made its mark on me as a work of consumption, destruction.

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The Line of Best Fit
Their review was positive

Highly Deadly Black Tarantula could very well be the title of a long-forgotten B Movie: a sci-fi spectacle whose plot preys upon our primordial fears — and our inexplicable attraction to them. Though Teeth of the Sea’s fourth record is devoid of any horror kitsch or cartoon gore, it is propelled throughout by a chilling and captivating psychic darkness, a kind of inverse transcendence that traverses the gradient between rumination, dread, and terror. The London-based quartet released their debut, Orphaned By The Ocean, in 2010 to both acclaim and discordance — the thorny question of their genre affiliation couldn’t easily be resolved by critics.

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