Broken

Album Review of Broken by Soulsavers.

Home » Electronic » Broken

Broken

Soulsavers

Broken by Soulsavers

Release Date: Aug 17, 2009
Record label: V2
Genre(s): Electronic

74 Music Critic Score
How the Music Critic Score works

Broken - Very Good, Based on 4 Critics

Observer Music Monthly - 80
Based on rating 4/5
80

Fabulously moody third album from British production duo whose roster of gloomy vocalists now includes Richard Hawley and Jason Pierce alongside regular collaborator Mark Lanegan..

Full Review >>

Drowned In Sound - 80
Based on rating 8/10
80

You're not allowed to proselytise where I'm from - it's against the law. Comes with adopting the identity of a secular country. Which is why the hawkers selling religion at my doorstep in my current location leave me bemused. I like to play with these purveyors of faith on my front porch in much the same way.

Full Review >>

PopMatters - 70
Based on rating 7/10
70

It’s hard to remember that Soulsavers is a collective now that Mark Lanegan’s draping his raspy croon all over things. The brainchild of producers Rich Machin and Ian Glover, Soulsavers is on only its third album, but Lanegan’s presence has taken their brooding, dark blend of electronica and grounded it firmly in a dark patch of earth. As on 2007’s It’s Not How Far You Fall, It’s the Way You Land, Lanegan (Screaming Trees, Queens of the Stone Age) is undoubtedly at the heart of Broken, but he’s also joined by guests like Butthole Surfers frontman Gibby Haynes, Spiritualized’s Jason Pierce, Pulp’s Mike Hawley, and Faith No More’s Mike Patton.

Full Review >>

Pitchfork - 63
Based on rating 6.3/10
63

For most of the 2000s, Mark Lanegan has been a wandering samurai in search of a master. He released only two solo full-lengths and an EP this decade, and those have been handily overshadowed by his hired-gun work with Martina Topley Bird, Melissa Auf der Maur, and the Baldwin Brothers, as well as his collaborations with Greg Dulli and Isobel Campbell. He could easily take the lead on any of these projects, but Lanegan seems to think we'll like him better in small doses.

Full Review >>