Christ Illusion

Album Review of Christ Illusion by Slayer.

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Christ Illusion

Slayer

Christ Illusion by Slayer

Release Date: Aug 8, 2006
Record label: Warner Bros
Genre(s): Rock, Metal

60 Music Critic Score
How the Music Critic Score works

Christ Illusion - Average, Based on 3 Critics

AllMusic - 80
Based on rating 8/10
80

Elsewhere, such as "Eyes of the Insane," the story comes in the first person from the point of view of a soldier who is suffering the effects of PTSD, yet he may or may not still be on the battlefield. Lombardo's drums open it slowly, then the Jeff Hanneman and Kerry King guitar gods create an intensely harrowing and angular riff that changes from verse to verse, through the refrain and bridge, and comes back again. Yeah, Slayer actually crafts and writes songs.

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The Guardian - 40
Based on rating 2/5
40

Given that cod-satanism is now the preserve of tweenie Marilyn Manson fans, and the grotesque fascism of National Socialist Black Metal is fulfilling heavy metal's need for parent-baiting taboos, it's hard to see how Slayer can shock any more. This attempt to revive past glories sees them reunited with producer Rick Rubin. But while no solo is left unwiddled, no riff left unchugged and no blasphemy left unuttered ("Religion's a whore," screams Tom Araya on Cult), Slayer seem unwilling to ditch the nu-metal tendencies that have made much of their recent output so resistible, which suggests Rubin's involvement was considerably less hands-on than in his remarkable redemptions of Johnny Cash and Neil Diamond.

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Dusted Magazine
Their review was generally favourable

Those involved in its creation hope that Slayer’s new disc, Christ Illusion, will be as revered as the band’s 1986 classic, Reign in Blood. Conventional wisdom says they’re punching above their weight. Still, the new effort has a couple of things going for it, not the least of which is the return of original drummer Dave Lombardo. The album was also executive-produced by Rick Rubin, who worked his antisocial magic on Reign.

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