Time for Annihilation: On the Record and on the Road

Album Review of Time for Annihilation: On the Record and on the Road by Papa Roach.

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Time for Annihilation: On the Record and on the Road

Papa Roach

Time for Annihilation: On the Record and on the Road by Papa Roach

Release Date: Aug 31, 2010
Record label: Eleven Seven
Genre(s): Pop/Rock, Alternative Metal, Heavy Metal, Hair Metal

64 Music Critic Score
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Time for Annihilation: On the Record and on the Road - Fairly Good, Based on 3 Critics

PopMatters - 70
Based on rating 7/10
70

There is virtually no way to capture the intensity of a Papa Roach live show in a recorded format. The band’s latest album, Time for Annihilation…On the Record and on the Road attempts to do so and comes as close to achieving that feat as possible without packaging in such intangibles as stage dives, blown-out eardrums and a vial of lead singer Jacoby Shaddix’s sweat. To sweeten the pot, Time for Annihilation includes five brand new studio tracks.

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Rock Sound - 70
Based on rating 7/10
70

The new album from Papa Roach is less teenage angst more radio-ready rock Never has an album and its moniker been so mismatched as this mostly live effort. Judging by the title alone, you’ll be expecting a full-throttle affair loaded with blood-thirsty ballads and riffery so heavy it could have a bludgeoning effect at 50 paces. However, what spills out ‘nicely’ into the airwaves is a collection of radio-ready rockers (including a couple of new Fall Out Boy-esque tracks), that even your nan would think are pleasant background sonics for her domino meetings down the community centre.

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AllMusic - 50
Based on rating 5/10
50

Parting ways from Geffen -- the label responded with a hits compilation the group did not endorse -- Papa Roach released Time for Annihilation, a hodge-podge of five new cuts and a nine live versions of Roach staples. It was a way of clearing the decks and getting back to basics after the Sunset Strip sleaze makeover of 2009’s Metamorphosis, a sound Papa Roach now ditches in favor of their alt-metal roots. Since they’re deliberate throwbacks, the newer tracks fit neatly with the live cuts, which retain their fidelity to the originals despite being pumped up and beefier than on record.

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