The Sun Will Come Up, The Seasons Will Change

Album Review of The Sun Will Come Up, The Seasons Will Change by Nina Nesbitt.

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The Sun Will Come Up, The Seasons Will Change

Nina Nesbitt

The Sun Will Come Up, The Seasons Will Change by Nina Nesbitt

Release Date: Feb 1, 2019
Record label: Cooking Vinyl
Genre(s): Pop/Rock

70 Music Critic Score
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The Sun Will Come Up, The Seasons Will Change - Fairly Good, Based on 3 Critics

AllMusic - 70
Based on rating 7/10
70

Arriving in 2019, Nina Nesbitt's first album for Cooking Vinyl, The Sun Will Come Up, the Seasons Will Change, follows her U.K. Top 20 debut, Peroxide, by five years. Though Peroxide was a collection of material written while she was in her teens, it already revealed a tendency toward earnest, thoughtful lyrics. The follow-up continues in kind, though it's notably (and understandably) more mature, while still navigating relationships and the quest for peace of mind.

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The Line of Best Fit - 70
Based on rating 7/10
70

2017 single "The Moments I'm Missing" sets the tone: a stripped-back roadtrip through Nesbitt's life. It's personal, poignant, and at times confessional, outlining not just who Nina Nesbitt is, but why she is the person she has become. Nesbitt is an accomplished songwriter, having penned tracks for artists including Jessie Ware and Olivia Holt alongside her own material.

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musicOMH.com - 70
Based on rating 3.5
70

While not the first single from Nina Nesbitt‘s The Sun Will Come Up, The Seasons Will Change, Loyal To Me received the most buzz partly because it best signified a radical shift in musical direction. An instantly catchy ode to knowing your worth, with ’90s R&B influences abounding and distinctly more poppy production than we're used to hearing from the singer-songwriter, this song's only crime might be to promise something that the album doesn't consistently deliver. Love Letter continues in that vein, trap 808s and more throwback R&B - Jamelia's Call Me, anyone? - accompanying a fiery kiss-off to a guy who "couldn't get it to-to-together", but there are also plenty of more understated songs, which range from powerful (such as album opener Sacred) to pretty but forgettable.

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