Something's Changing

Album Review of Something's Changing by Lucy Rose.

Home » Pop/Rock » Something's Changing

Something's Changing

Lucy Rose

Something's Changing by Lucy Rose

Release Date: Jul 14, 2017
Record label: Arts & Crafts
Genre(s): Pop/Rock, Alternative/Indie Rock, Alternative Singer/Songwriter

71 Music Critic Score
How the Music Critic Score works

Buy Something's Changing from Amazon

Something's Changing - Very Good, Based on 5 Critics

The 405 - 80
Based on rating 8/10
80

The title of Lucy Rose's third album Something's Changing is perhaps the musical understatement of 2017. Much has changed for the mild mannered songwriter; she has parted ways with the major label that released her first two records, travelled the globe and relocated to Brighton to make this new LP with producer Tim Bidwell. Created in comforting surroundings with a host of friends and collaborators including Elena Tonra of Daughter fame, Bear's Den's Marcus Hamblett and The Staves, Something's Changing also becomes a comfort and company for its listener.

Full Review >>

AllMusic - 80
Based on rating 8/10
80

In the spring of 2016, with only a guitar and backpack in hand, English singer/songwriter Lucy Rose embarked on a two-month tour of Latin America. Partly organized by fans who provided lodging, she not only wrote her third studio album, Something's Changing, on the trip, but captured key moments of the experience on video for a companion documentary short. When it came time to record the resulting songs back in England, she did so at producer Tim Bidwell's home studio with a certain intimacy and group performances in mind, and included guests such as Elena Tonra of Daughter, Marcus Hamblett of Bear's Den, and the Staves.

Full Review >>

Paste Magazine - 75
Based on rating 7.5/10
75

For the past five years, Lucy Rose has mastered the art of intimate folk music. "Shiver," her 2012 wistful look back at heartbreak, was enough to draw in -- one that grew even greater after it narrated the ending of Hannah and Adam's tumultuous relationship on Girls. But three albums in, the British singer-songwriter has found a confidence that was lacking perhaps because she hadn't enough life experience.

Full Review >>

The Guardian - 60
Based on rating 3/5
60

I t's a music industry story as old as time: DIY folkie signs to major, becomes tired of compromise, leaves label and sets off on tour across South America, sustained exclusively by the food and makeshift beds provided by fans and their families. The "if you book me a gig, I'll come and stay" method Lucy Rose employed throughout Latin America, where she has an unexpectedly healthy audience, rejuvenated her career, but her globetrotting exploits have had no influence on her willowy sound. There are flecks of the retro chic of noughties revivalist Rumer on Not Good at All, and the mellower end of UK noughties indie - Turin Brakes - on Soak It Up.

Full Review >>

DIY Magazine - 60
Based on rating 3/5
60

As glamorous as it might sound and as exciting as we're sure the experience was for Lucy Rose, the story behind her third full-length is a little bit of a cliched one; she did quite a bit of finding herself in South America, by the sounds of it, playing gigs wherever she could and crashing with fans most of the time - just her and her guitar, travelling from country to country on inter-city buses. There's no Latin flavour on 'Something's Changing', but that doesn't make the title a complete misnomer; this is a palpable gear-change from her last two albums. Key to its success is the pared-back approach that she's taken - as tempted as she might have been to throw a kitchen sink's worth of ideas at the record, she instead shows restraint, with a bare-bones approach that puts her voice front and centre.

Full Review >>

'Something's Changing'

is available now