Lease Of Life

Album Review of Lease Of Life by Errors.

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Lease Of Life

Errors

Lease Of Life by Errors

Release Date: Mar 23, 2015
Record label: Rock Action Records
Genre(s): Pop/Rock

75 Music Critic Score
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Lease Of Life - Very Good, Based on 7 Critics

musicOMH.com - 80
Based on rating 4
80

Glasgow three-piece Errors have come a long way since the band was initially formed as a bedroom electronic project in 2004. In just over a decade, they have gradually built on the critical success of their debut album, 2008’s It’s Not Something But It Is Like Whatever, always looking to bring something new to the table. This culminated in their highly acclaimed third album, Have Some Faith In Magic, which was released in 2012.

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Drowned In Sound - 80
Based on rating 8/10
80

Errors occupy a strange space in the musical landscape. Caught somewhere between instrumental electronica, indie rock, techno and pop, their little world is very much of their own making, and over the past five or so years they’ve been gradually shifting away from more guitar-based instrumental fare into a fully fledged electronic pop band. On fourth album Lease Of Life, the Glaswegian trio sound more assured than ever.

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DIY Magazine - 80
Based on rating 4/5
80

Considering that they still struggle with which notes lie where on a keyboard, Errors have been able to produce an array of seriously accomplished sounds over a string of releases. Whether making post-rock that’s been chucked through a club, or more enveloping electro warmers, Errors have always favoured progression. On ‘Lease Of Life’ things are no different, and the exploration of this new territory is best summed up by considering that Errors are a band that have gone from supporting Mogwai and 65daysofstatic in their earlier years, to opening up for Chvrches in 2014.

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The 405 - 60
Based on rating 6/10
60

Head here to submit your own review of this album. In their eleven years together, Glasgow band Errors have embodied the linear progression we've come to expect from our artists. Each of their albums has served to move the band forward in a direction that the one prior subtly telegraphed - that they teased in one and fully explored in the next. From the hyped-up, lo-fi indie-electronica of their first album, It's Not Something, but it is Like Whatever, came Come Down With Me's more assured blend of guitars and electronica, and from the eighties-tinged synths that lurked beneath Come Down With Me came the twinkling netherworld of Have Some Faith In Magic.

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New Musical Express (NME)
Their review was positive

You know about the big releases each week, but what about those smaller albums which may have passed underneath your radar. Don’t miss out on the smaller, lesser-known gems which might become some of your favourites. We’ve rounded up six of the best new album releases from this week: catch up with former electro-punks Errors, retro Chicago troubadour Ryley Walker and more.

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The Quietus
Their review was positive

One of the striking things about Glasgow's music scene – and the wider musical community in Scotland – is the camaraderie between bands. There's room for a multitude of genres and styles, with artists respecting and endorsing each others' work. A resurgence of electro/synthpop has been evident over the past few years, with the likes of Chvrches and Prides carving out the most commercially polished path, and more guitar focused groups increasingly dabbling with samples and sequencers.

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The Line of Best Fit
Their review was positive

Building on the breakout success of their celebrated 2012 album, Have Some Faith In Magic, Errors have assembled a cohesive collection of lush atmospherics that is equal measures a retro-tinged homage to the ‘80s as well as an assured creative leap forward for a band that continues to redefine their own distinctive sonic niche. The album hums by dynamically, only occasionally pausing a moment with instrumental interludes (blissful opener “Colossal Estates”, the pensive “Early Nights”) that properly set the mood for the vivacious, synth-laden numbers that follow. That these songs were created in the remote Hebridean Isle Of Jura – the location where George Orwell wrote his dystopian masterpiece, Nineteen Eighty-Four – only adds to the grand sense of ambition that permeates this buoyant new collection.

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