Love What Survives

Album Review of Love What Survives by Mount Kimbie.

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Love What Survives

Mount Kimbie

Love What Survives by Mount Kimbie

Release Date: Sep 8, 2017
Record label: Warp
Genre(s): Electronic, Pop/Rock

78 Music-Critic Score
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Love What Survives - Very Good, Based on 12 Critics

Tiny Mix Tapes - 90
Based on rating 4.5/5
90

It took some time to hear what Mount Kimbie were doing. Crooks & Lovers, a wonderful document of its time, received wide acclaim and played a major part in ushering in what we faithful fondly recall as the “Majestic Casual” era. Despite a full three years passing in between, follow-up Cold Spring Fault Less Youth was a lot of the same.

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Pitchfork - 84
Based on rating 8.4/10
84

From the jump, Mount Kimbie have been contrarian. The duo of Dominic Maker and Kai Campos may have chosen a handle that suggests a towering geological formation, but they quip that it merely signifies .

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PopMatters - 80
Based on rating 8/10
80

Moving beyond the constraints of dubstep, Mount Kimbie revels in deconstructing the genre. The duo consisting of Dominic Maker and Kai Campos was one of the first acts to dwell in the post-dubstep realm, something that was apparent from their early EP releases, and followed into their debut album Crooks & Lovers. This deviation from the norm carried down with the evolution of Mount Kimbie, infecting the sound of Cold Spring Fault Less Youth, opening up the music to more adventurous pathways.

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Record Collector - 80
Based on rating 4/5
80

Though Mount Kimbie were labelled as post-dubstep in their early career, the description was more than a little incongruous given the sheer variety of influences that lit up their debut album Crooks & Lovers. Their follow-up effort Cold Spring Fault Less Youth began a move towards live instrumentation; its amalgamation of styles .

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Under The Radar - 80
Based on rating 8/10
80

On the third album from electronic duo Mount Kimbie (Dominic Maker and Kai Campos), it is the gnarly stuff that is best. Once the storming drums really get going, "Blue Train Lines" featuring King Krule, a long-time Mount Kimbie collaborator (and young English maverick in his own right), is a wonderfully troubled, breathless anthem. With four guest vocalists, each with very different ranges and vocal sentiments, Mount Kimbie have done well to piece together a tight album from what otherwise could very quickly have become a disparate collection of tracks.

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DIY Magazine - 80
Based on rating 4/5
80

Following 2013’s ‘Cold Spring Fault Less Youth’, Mount Kimbie’s Dom Maker said a third record was something they wanted to work on quickly. Too long had passed, he said, between that and their 2010 debut. Perhaps his relocation to LA – where’s he’s worked with Jay Z (!!) – got in the way, but it’s taken four long years for Mount Kimbie to return with the drastically new outlook of ‘Love What Survives’. While ‘Cold Spring’ felt loosely rooted in ‘Crooks & Lovers’, ‘Love What Survives’ plots the duo on a whole new path - its hazier, more organic sound, pinned by the influence of German experimental pioneers to a greater extent than that of UK dance.

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Resident Advisor - 80
Based on rating 4.0/5
80

During the 1970s, the German drummers Jaki Liebezeit and Klaus Dinger pioneered a style of beat that became known as motorik. Even if you don't know the name, you'll know the motorik when you hear it.

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The Guardian - 80
Based on rating 4/5
80

I n recent years, London duo Mount Kimbie have shrugged off their post-dubstep past and started to create songs that shepherd synth-heavy post-punk into the present day. On their third album, the band.

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Drowned In Sound - 70
Based on rating 7/10
70

It’s been four years since Mount Kimbie released their second album Cold Spring Fault Less Youth and put the shackles of the post-dubstep genre behind them. Although it’s a tag that’s still hard to shake, the album managed to deliver on the high expectations and acclaim surrounding their debut while simultaneously taking the duo in a more expansive, less restrictive direction. Love What Survives, their third full length and second on Warp, is a continuation of that journey, but this time it’s fuelled by a fascination with motorik rhythms and aided by some familiar collaborative faces..

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The 405 - 65
Based on rating 6.5/10
65

Mount Kimbie have always defied categorisation. Their early recordings were simple affairs of skittering programmed drums and some fairly lo-fi synth atmosphere. They deployed this to devastating effect, earning them a debut album released on Hotflush, and a second one on Warp, where it seemed they would fit in nicely amidst the Sheffield label.

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The Observer (UK) - 60
Based on rating 3/5
60

S ince their acclaimed 2010 debut Crooks & Lovers, production duo Dominic Maker and Kai Campos, AKA Mount Kimbie, have gradually shaken off their .

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Clash Music
Their review was positive

Transition and progression are two attributes that Mount Kimbie have embraced with arms open wide on ‘Love What Survives’. Produced mostly on two vintage synths; a Korg MS-20 and Korg Delta, the crisp production of their previous album ‘Cold Spring Fault Less Youth’ has been traded in for a retro-fuelled fuzzy haze of post-punk basslines reminiscent of Joy Division. ‘Four Years and One Day’ sounds as though a spacecraft has landed, as the synths waver, building tension as the track unfurls with urgency..

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